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Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2022-09-11 and last amended on 2022-03-06. Previous Versions

Part VI — General Operating and Flight Rules (continued)

Subpart 2 — Operating and Flight Rules (continued)

Division I — General (continued)

Altimeter-setting and Operating Procedures in Transition between Regions

 Except where otherwise authorized by an air traffic control unit, each flight crew member who occupies a flight crew member position that is equipped with an altimeter shall

  • (a) when flying from the altimeter-setting region into the standard pressure region, set the altimeter to 29.92 inches of mercury or 1,013.2 millibars immediately after the aircraft’s entry into the standard pressure region; and

  • (b) when flying from the standard pressure region into the altimeter-setting region, set the altimeter to the altimeter setting of the nearest station along the route of flight or, where the nearest stations along the route of flight are separated by more than 150 nautical miles, the altimeter setting of a station near the route of flight immediately before the aircraft’s entry into the altimeter-setting region.

Flight over the High Seas

 The pilot-in-command of a Canadian aircraft that is in flight over the high seas shall comply with the applicable Rules of the Air set out in Annex 2 to the Convention and the applicable Regional Supplementary Procedures set out in Document 7030/4 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Transoceanic Flight

 No pilot-in-command of a single-engined aircraft, or of a multi-engined aircraft that would be unable to maintain flight in the event of the failure of any engine, shall commence a flight that will leave Canadian Domestic Airspace and enter airspace over the high seas unless

  • (a) the pilot-in-command holds a pilot licence endorsed with an instrument rating;

  • (b) the aircraft is equipped with

    • (i) the equipment referred to in section 605.18,

    • (ii) a high frequency radio capable of transmitting and receiving on a minimum of two appropriate international air-ground general purpose frequencies, and

    • (iii) hypothermia protection for each person on board; and

  • (c) the aircraft carries sufficient fuel to meet the requirements of section 602.88 and, in addition, carries contingency fuel equal to at least 10 per cent of the fuel required pursuant to section 602.88 to complete the flight to the aerodrome of destination.

Landing at or Take-off from an Aerodrome at Night
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall conduct a landing or a take-off in a heavier-than-air aircraft at night at an aerodrome unless the aerodrome is lighted in accordance with the aerodrome lighting requirements specified in Part III.

  • (2) A person may conduct a landing or a take-off in a heavier-than-air aircraft at night at an aerodrome that is not lighted in accordance with the requirements referred to in subsection (1) where

    • (a) the flight is conducted without creating a hazard to persons or property on the surface; and

    • (b) the aircraft is operated

      • (i) for the purpose of a police operation that is conducted in the service of a police authority, or

      • (ii) for the purpose of saving human life.

 [Repealed, SOR/2019-11, s. 16]

Large Unoccupied Free Balloons

 No person shall release an unoccupied free balloon having a gas-carrying capacity of more than 115 cubic feet (3.256 m3) except in accordance with an authorization issued by the Minister pursuant to section 602.44.

Rockets

 No person shall launch a rocket, other than a model rocket or a rocket of a type used in a fireworks display, except in accordance with an authorization issued by the Minister pursuant to section 602.44.

Authorization by the Minister

 The Minister may issue an authorization referred to in section 602.42 or 602.43 where the release of the balloon or the launch of the rocket is in the public interest and is not likely to affect aviation safety.

Kites and Model Rockets

 No person shall fly a kite or launch a model rocket or a rocket of a type used in a fireworks display into cloud or in a manner that is or is likely to be hazardous to aviation safety.

Refusal to Transport

 No air operator or private operator shall transport a person if at the time of check-in or at boarding the actions or statements of the person indicate that the person may present a risk to the safety of the aircraft, persons or property.

  • SOR/2009-90, s. 3
Suitable Accommodation

 A private operator or an air operator, as the case may be, shall provide a flight crew member with suitable accommodation for rest periods away from home base.

  • SOR/2018-269, s. 6

[602.48 to 602.56 reserved]

Division II — Operational and Emergency Equipment Requirements

Application

 This Division applies to persons operating

  • (a) Canadian aircraft; and

  • (b) foreign aircraft in Canada where those persons are Canadian citizens, permanent residents or corporations incorporated by or under the laws of Canada or a province.

Prohibition

 No person shall operate an aircraft referred to in section 602.57 unless the operational and emergency equipment required by these Regulations is carried on board.

Equipment Standards
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall operate an aircraft unless the operational and emergency equipment carried on board the aircraft

    • (a) meets the applicable standards specified in the Airworthiness Manual; and

    • (b) is functional.

  • (2) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply in respect of the following operational and emergency equipment:

    • (a) survival equipment;

    • (b) [Repealed, SOR/2019-49, s. 3]

    • (c) a hand-held fire extinguisher, except if carried on board an aircraft operated under Subpart 4 or Part VII, where the extinguisher meets the applicable standards published by the Canadian Standards Association;

    • (d) a first aid kit;

    • (e) aeronautical charts and publications;

    • (f) a timepiece; and

    • (g) a flashlight.

Requirements for Power-driven Aircraft
  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in a power-driven aircraft, other than an ultra-light aeroplane, unless the following operational and emergency equipment is carried on board:

    • (a) a checklist or placards that enable the aircraft to be operated in accordance with limitations specified in the aircraft flight manual, aircraft operating manual, pilot operating handbook or any equivalent document provided by the manufacturer;

    • (b) all of the necessary current aeronautical charts and publications covering the route of the proposed flight and any probable diversionary route, if the aircraft is operated in VFR OTT, night VFR flight or IFR flight;

    • (c) a current database, if the aircraft is operated in IFR flight, in VFR OTT flight or in night VFR flight under Subpart 4 of Part VI or Subpart 2, 3, 4 or 5 of Part VII and database-dependent navigation equipment is used;

    • (d) current data covering the route of the proposed flight and any probable diversionary route, if the aircraft is operated in VFR OTT flight other than VFR OTT flight referred to in paragraph (c) and database-dependent navigation equipment is used;

    • (e) a hand-held fire extinguisher in the cockpit that

      • (i) is of a type suitable for extinguishing fires that are likely to occur,

      • (ii) is designed to minimize the hazard of toxic gas concentrations, and

      • (iii) is readily available to each flight crew member;

    • (f) a timepiece that is readily available to each flight crew member and that displays the time in hours, minutes and seconds;

    • (g) a flashlight that is readily available to each crew member, if the aircraft is operated at night; and

    • (h) a first aid kit.

  • (2) A checklist or placards referred to in paragraph (1)(a) shall enable the aircraft to be operated in normal, abnormal and emergency conditions and shall include

    • (a) a pre-start check;

    • (b) a pre-take-off check;

    • (c) a post-take-off check;

    • (d) a pre-landing check; and

    • (e) emergency procedures.

  • (3) Emergency procedures referred to in paragraph (2)(e) shall include

    • (a) emergency operation of fuel, hydraulic, electrical and mechanical systems, where applicable;

    • (b) emergency operation of instruments and controls, where applicable;

    • (c) engine inoperative procedures; and

    • (d) any other procedure that is necessary for aviation safety.

  • (4) Checks and emergency procedures referred to in subsections (2) and (3) shall be performed and followed where they are applicable.

Survival Equipment — Flights over Land
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall operate an aircraft over land unless there is carried on board survival equipment, sufficient for the survival on the ground of each person on board, given the geographical area, the season of the year and anticipated seasonal climatic variations, that provides the means for

    • (a) starting a fire;

    • (b) providing shelter;

    • (c) providing or purifying water; and

    • (d) visually signalling distress.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of

    • (a) a balloon, a glider, a hang glider, a gyroplane or an ultra-light aeroplane;

    • (b) an aircraft that is operated within 25 nautical miles of the aerodrome of departure and that has the capability of radiocommunication with a surface-based radio station for the duration of the flight;

    • (c) a multi-engined aircraft that is operated south of 66° 30’ north latitude

      • (i) in IFR flight within controlled airspace, or

      • (ii) along designated air routes;

    • (d) an aircraft that is operated by an air operator, where the aircraft is equipped with equipment specified in the air operator’s company operations manual, but not with the equipment required by subsection (1); or

    • (e) an aircraft that is operated in a geographical area where and at a time of year when the survival of the persons on board is not jeopardized.

Life Preservers and Flotation Devices
  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off or a landing on water in an aircraft or operate an aircraft over water beyond a point where the aircraft could reach shore in the event of an engine failure, unless a life preserver, individual flotation device or personal flotation device is carried for each person on board.

  • (2) No person shall operate a land aeroplane, gyroplane, helicopter or airship at more than 50 nautical miles from shore unless a life preserver is carried for each person on board.

  • (3) No person shall operate a balloon at more than two nautical miles from shore unless a life preserver, individual flotation device or personal flotation device is carried for each person on board.

  • (4) Subject to subsection (5), for aircraft other than balloons, every life preserver, individual flotation device and personal flotation device referred to in this section shall be stowed in a position that is easily accessible to the person for whose use it is provided, when that person is seated.

  • (5) In cases where infant life preservers are carried on board an aircraft operated with flight attendants on board, the infant life preservers may be stowed in bulk in a location that is easily accessible to the flight attendants if

    • (a) the location is adjacent to a ditching emergency exit and is clearly marked as the stowage location for infant life preservers; and

    • (b) the operator has established procedures that require flight attendants to distribute an infant life preserver to each passenger responsible for an infant when preparing for a ditching.

Life Rafts and Survival Equipment — Flights over Water
  •  (1) No person shall operate over water a single-engined aeroplane, or a multi-engined aeroplane that is unable to maintain flight with any engine failed, at more than 100 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 30 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (2) Subject to subsection (3), no person shall operate over water a multi-engined aeroplane that is able to maintain flight with any engine failed at more than 200 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 60 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (3) A person may operate over water a transport category aircraft that is an aeroplane, at up to 400 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 120 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site without the life rafts referred to in subsection (2) being carried on board.

  • (4) No person shall operate over water a single-engined helicopter, or a multi-engined helicopter that is unable to maintain flight with any engine failed, at more than 25 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 15 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (5) No person shall operate over water a multi-engined helicopter that is able to maintain flight with any engine failed at more than 50 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 30 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (6) The life rafts referred to in this section shall be

    • (a) stowed so that they are easily accessible for use in the event of a ditching;

    • (b) installed in conspicuously marked locations near an exit; and

    • (c) equipped with an attached survival kit, sufficient for the survival on water of each person on board the aircraft, given the geographical area, the season of the year and anticipated seasonal climatic variations, that provides a means for

      • (i) providing shelter,

      • (ii) providing or purifying water, and

      • (iii) visually signalling distress.

  • (7) Where a helicopter is required to carry life rafts pursuant to subsection (4) or (5), no person shall operate the helicopter over water having a temperature of less than 10oC unless

    • (a) a helicopter passenger transportation suit system that conforms to paragraph 551.407(c) of the Airworthiness Manual is provided for each passenger on board;

    • (b) a helicopter crew member transportation suit system is provided for each crew member on board; and

    • (c) the pilot-in-command directs all persons on board to wear their helicopter transportation suit system.

  • (8) Every person who has been directed to wear a helicopter transportation suit system pursuant to paragraph (7)(c) shall wear that suit system.

 
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