Antarctic Environmental Protection Regulations (SOR/2003-363)

Regulations are current to 2017-11-20 and last amended on 2010-09-23. Previous Versions

Antarctic Environmental Protection Regulations

SOR/2003-363

ANTARCTIC ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT

Registration 2003-11-10

Antarctic Environmental Protection Regulations

P.C. 2003-1806 2003-11-10

Whereas the annexed proposed Regulations entitled Antarctic Environmental Protection Regulations are respecting matters that the Governor in Council considers necessary for carrying out the purposes of the Antarctic Environmental Protection ActFootnote a;

Therefore, Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 26(1) of the Antarctic Environmental Protection Acta, hereby makes the annexed Antarctic Environmental Protection Regulations.

Interpretation

Marginal note:Definition

 In these Regulations, Act means the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act.

Application for Permits

Marginal note:Who may apply

 Any person may apply for a permit.

Marginal note:Application form

 An application for a permit must be in the form set out in Schedule 1 and must contain the information required by the form.

Marginal note:Content of application

 An application for a permit must be signed by the applicant and must include, in addition to the information required by the application form,

  • (a) a preliminary environmental evaluation that meets the requirements of section 14;

  • (b) a description of the procedures to be put into place by the applicant, including any monitoring, to assess and verify the environmental impact of the activities to which the permit is to relate;

  • (c) the Management Plan, if any, for any specially protected area to which the permit relates;

  • (d) a waste management plan that meets the requirements of sections 34 and 35;

  • (e) an emergency plan that meets the requirements of section 48; and

  • (f) a description of anything that the applicant intends to remove from the Antarctic.

Marginal note:Acknowledgment of application

 Within 30 days after the Minister receives an application for a permit, the Minister must send the applicant an acknowledgment that the application has been received.

Marginal note:Minister’s decision

 The Minister must provide to the applicant a written notice of the Minister’s decision concerning the application within 90 days after the application is received if

  • (a) the applicant has provided the Minister with all of the information that is required by these Regulations or requested by the Minister under subsection 21(3) of the Act; and

  • (b) the Minister, after considering the preliminary environmental evaluation in relation to the activities to which the permit is to relate, is of the opinion that the activities will likely have less than a minor or transitory impact on the environment.

Marginal note:Further evaluation

 If the Minister is of the opinion that the activities are likely to have at least a minor or transitory impact on the environment, the Minister must

  • (a) within 90 days after receiving the application, inform the applicant in writing that an initial environmental evaluation or a comprehensive environmental evaluation, as the case may be, must be conducted by the applicant; and

  • (b) within 90 days after the completion of all the environmental evaluations that are required under section 23 of the Act, provide to the applicant a written notice of the Minister’s decision concerning the application.

Security

Marginal note:When security to be provided
  •  (1) If the Minister requires security to be provided by an applicant for a permit, the security must be provided to the Minister at the time the permit is issued.

  • Marginal note:Amount of security

    (2) The amount of security that may be required is $2,000,000.

  • Marginal note:Time security to be maintained

    (3) The time during which the security must be maintained may not be longer than two years after the expiry date of the permit.

Permits

Marginal note:Content of permit

 Each permit must set out

  • (a) the name of the permit holder;

  • (b) the name of the persons authorized to conduct activities in the Antarctic;

  • (c) the names of the vessels authorized to conduct activities in the Antarctic;

  • (d) a description of the authorized activities, including where those activities are to be conducted;

  • (e) a description of anything that the permit holder is allowed to remove from the Antarctic;

  • (f) the date of issuance of the permit;

  • (g) the date of expiry of the permit; and

  • (h) the conditions of the permit.

Marginal note:Condition

 The Minister may include in a permit the condition that the permit is not valid if the application for the permit contained any false or misleading information or failed to include any relevant information that might reasonably have affected the Minister’s decision to issue the permit.

Marginal note:Permit not transferable

 A permit is not transferable.

Obligations

Marginal note:Obligations
  •  (1) The permit holder must

    • (a) ensure that all persons to whom the permit applies receive training designed to limit the impact of their activities on the Antarctic environment;

    • (b) inform all persons to whom the permit applies of the requirements of the permit and these Regulations, including the requirements relating to the waste management plan and the emergency plan;

    • (c) within the time required in the permit, provide the Minister with a written summary report on the activities conducted within the Antarctic;

    • (d) unless subsection (2) applies, declare in the written summary report that all of the conditions of the permit have been fully adhered to;

    • (e) provide the Minister with an itinerary for the activities, including the route to be followed;

    • (f) notify the Minister in advance about any significant changes to the itinerary, including changes to the route to be followed; and

    • (g) provide any additional information that is requested by the Minister, within 30 days after the day on which the request is made.

  • Marginal note:Failure to comply with condition

    (2) If the permit holder or any other person to whom the permit applies fails to comply with a condition of the permit, the permit holder must give the Minister

    • (a) notice of that failure without delay and in any event within 30 days after the day on which the failure to comply occurs; and

    • (b) a written report, within 60 days after the day on which the failure to comply occurs, that identifies the condition and explains the failure to comply.

  • Marginal note:Possession and production of permits

    (3) Every permit holder and every other person to whom the permit applies must

    • (a) either be in possession of the permit, or a numbered copy of the permit, or have ready access to it at all times while in the Antarctic; and

    • (b) produce the permit, or a numbered copy of the permit, on request to the Minister, an inspector designated by the Minister under subsection 45(1) of the Act or an observer designated under Article VII of the Treaty.

  • Marginal note:Permit on vessel

    (4) A permit issued for a vessel must be kept on board the vessel.

Suspension or Cancellation of Permit

Marginal note:Surrender of permit

 Any person having possession or custody of a permit that has been suspended or cancelled by the Minister must surrender the permit, and any numbered copies of it, to the Minister by the date specified in the notice of suspension or cancellation.

Environmental Impact Assessment

Marginal note:Assessment of impacts of activities
  •  (1) The preliminary environmental evaluation that must be included with an application for a permit must

    • (a) indicate whether, in the opinion of the applicant, the activities to which the permit is to relate will have more than a minor or transitory impact on the Antarctic environment; and

    • (b) contain enough details of the impacts of those activities on that environment to allow the Minister to assess whether the activities will likely have more than a minor or transitory impact on that environment.

  • Marginal note:What must be included

    (2) The preliminary environmental evaluation must include

    • (a) a description of each proposed activity that includes the purpose, nature, location, duration and frequency of the activity;

    • (b) a consideration of alternatives to the proposed activities, including the alternative of not proceeding, and the consequences of those alternatives;

    • (c) a description of any environmental impacts that the proposed activities may have, including a description of predicted cumulative impacts in the light of existing and planned activities;

    • (d) a description of the initial environmental reference state with which predicted changes are to be compared and a prediction of the future environmental reference state in the absence of the proposed activities;

    • (e) a description of the methods and data used to predict the environmental impacts of the proposed activities;

    • (f) an estimation of the nature, extent, duration and intensity of the likely direct environmental impacts of the proposed activities;

    • (g) a consideration of possible indirect or secondary environmental impacts of the proposed activities;

    • (h) an identification of measures, including monitoring programs, that

      • (i) could be taken to minimize or mitigate the environmental impacts of the proposed activities and to detect unforeseen impacts, and

      • (ii) could provide an early warning of any adverse effects of the proposed activities and could deal promptly and effectively with accidents;

    • (i) an identification of the unavoidable environmental impacts of the proposed activities;

    • (j) a consideration of the effects of the proposed activities on the conduct of scientific research and on other existing uses and values;

    • (k) an identification of gaps in knowledge and uncertainties encountered in compiling the information relating to the evaluation;

    • (l) a non-technical summary of the information provided;

    • (m) the name and address of the person or organization that prepared the evaluation; and

    • (n) any other information relevant to the proposed activities.

  • SOR/2010-196, s. 1(F).

Historic Sites and Monuments

Marginal note:Designation

 The historic sites and monuments in the Antarctic that are designated for the purpose of section 16 of the Act are the ones set out in Schedule 2.

Native and Non-native Species

Native Species

Marginal note:Limitation on authority to issue permit

 The Minister may issue a permit for the purpose of an activity to which section 12 of the Act applies only if that purpose is

  • (a) to provide specimens for scientific study or scientific information;

  • (b) to provide specimens for museums, herbaria, zoological or botanical gardens or other educational or cultural institutions or uses; or

  • (c) to provide for unavoidable consequences of other scientific activities or the construction and operation of scientific support facilities.

Marginal note:Manner of taking

 The Minister may include in a permit for the taking of native mammals or native birds the condition that the taking of the mammals or birds must be done in the manner that involves the least degree of pain and suffering practicable being inflicted on them.

Marginal note:Factors to be considered

 In considering whether to issue a permit referred to in section 12 of the Act, the Minister may take into account the permits issued by all other Parties to the Protocol to ensure that

  • (a) only small numbers of native mammals or native birds are killed and the number of native mammals or native birds that are killed during a season from a local population, considered along with the number of native mammals or native birds from that local population that are taken or to be taken under other permits, is not so great that the total number of native mammals or native birds taken from the local population could not be replaced by normal natural reproduction during the following season; and

  • (b) the diversity of species, as well as the habitats essential to their existence, and the balance of the ecological systems existing within the Antarctic are maintained.

  • SOR/2010-196, s. 2(E).

Specially Protected Species

Marginal note:Limitation on issuance of permit

 The Minister may issue a permit for the purpose of section 12 of the Act for the taking of a specially protected species set out in Appendix A of Annex II to the Protocol only if the taking

  • (a) is for a compelling scientific purpose;

  • (b) will not jeopardize the survival or recovery of that species or the local population of that species; and

  • (c) is done using non-lethal techniques, if practicable.

Non-native Species

Marginal note:No dogs to be introduced

 A permit may not be issued for the purpose of subsection 13(1) of the Act to allow any dog to be introduced into the Antarctic.

Marginal note:Species that may be introduced

 Permits may be issued for the purpose of subsection 13(1) of the Act to allow the introduction into the Antarctic of animals or plants of a species listed in Appendix B to Annex II to the Protocol.

Marginal note:Content of permits

 Any permit issued for the purpose of subsection 13(1) of the Act must specify

  • (a) the species that may be introduced into the Antarctic;

  • (b) the number of members of that species that may be introduced;

  • (c) if appropriate, the age and sex of the members that may be introduced;

  • (d) the precautions to be taken to prevent

    • (i) any escape of the members,

    • (ii) any contact of the members with native fauna and flora, and

    • (iii) any interference with an ecosystem of the Antarctic; and

  • (e) the obligations set out in section 23.

Marginal note:Removal or disposal
  •  (1) Before the expiry of a permit, the permit holder must remove from the Antarctic or dispose of

    • (a) any plant or animal in respect of which the permit is issued and any progeny of the plant or animal; and

    • (b) any other plant or animal that the permit holder has introduced and that is not indigenous to the Antarctic, including the progeny of any such plant or animal, unless the plant or animal poses no risk to native flora or fauna or to an ecosystem of the Antarctic.

  • Marginal note:Means of disposal

    (2) The disposal must be

    • (a) in a case to which paragraph (1)(a) applies, by incineration or an equally effective means that eliminates risk to native fauna and flora and to the ecosystems of the Antarctic; and

    • (b) in a case to which paragraph (1)(b) applies, by incineration or an equally effective means that renders the plants or animals sterile.

Marginal note:Plant and animal parts and products

 A permit holder must keep all parts and products of plants and animals that are introduced into the Antarctic under carefully controlled conditions, and before the expiry of the permit must dispose of them in a manner that eliminates any risk to native fauna and flora and to the ecosystems of the Antarctic.

Specified Substances and Products

Marginal note:Specification

 The substances and products that are set out in Article 7 of Annex III to the Protocol are specified for the purpose of section 14 of the Act.

Specially Protected Areas

Marginal note:Designation of areas

 The Antarctic specially protected areas that are designated for the purpose of section 15 of the Act are the ones set out in Schedule 3.

Marginal note:Management Plan

 In considering whether to issue a permit for the purpose of section 15 of the Act in relation to a specially protected area, the Minister must take into account the Management Plan for the specially protected area.

Marginal note:Content of permits

 Any permit issued for the purpose of section 15 of the Act in relation to a specially protected area

  • (a) must be accompanied by the sections of the Management Plan for the specially protected area that are relevant to the activity for which the permit was sought; and

  • (b) must specify

    • (i) the extent and location of the specially protected area,

    • (ii) the activities that are authorized in relation to the specially protected area,

    • (iii) when, where and by whom the activities may be conducted, and

    • (iv) any other conditions that are imposed by the Management Plan.

Marginal note:Area without Management Plan

 In the case of a specially protected area that does not have a Management Plan, any activities authorized by a permit issued for the purpose of section 15 of the Act must be for a compelling scientific purpose that cannot be served elsewhere and must not jeopardize the natural ecological system in the area.

  • SOR/2010-196, s. 3.

Waste Management

General Requirements

Marginal note:Application

 If wastes are mixed with another substance and the substances in the mixture are subject to different requirements under sections 31 to 33 and 37 to 46, the most stringent of the requirements under those sections that apply to any of the substances apply to the mixture.

  • SOR/2010-196, s. 4(F).
Marginal note:Storage

 Each permit holder who must remove wastes from the Antarctic or otherwise dispose of them must store them, until they are removed or disposed of, in such a way as to prevent their dispersal into the environment.

Marginal note:Removal of wastes

 The permit holder must return wastes that are removed from the Antarctic to the country from which the activities generating the waste were organized or to any other country in which arrangements have been made for the disposal of the wastes in accordance with relevant international agreements.

Marginal note:Field camp wastes

 The permit holder must take all reasonable steps to move the wastes generated at a field camp to

  • (a) the station or vessel from which the field camp is supported; or

  • (b) another station or vessel if the permit holder has arranged for the wastes to be managed there in accordance with Annex III to the Protocol.

Waste Management Plan

Marginal note:Contents of plan

 Each waste management plan must apply to all wastes generated by the activities to which the permit is to relate, including wastes generated by vessels, stations and field camps, and must

  • (a) include measures for the reduction, recycling, safe storage, removal and disposal of wastes from the activities to which the permit is to relate, as well as an undertaking by the permit holder to respect the measures described in sections 37 to 44;

  • (b) provide that all reasonable steps must be taken to minimize the amount of waste generated or disposed of in the Antarctic;

  • (c) specify current and planned waste management measures, including measures for final disposal;

  • (d) specify current and planned measures for analysing the effects of waste and waste management on the Antarctic environment;

  • (e) specify other measures to minimize any negative effects of waste and waste management on the Antarctic environment; and

  • (f) specify the method used for recording wastes.

  • SOR/2010-196, s. 5.
Marginal note:Classification of wastes

 In the waste management plan, wastes produced must be classified as

  • (a) sewage and domestic liquid wastes (Group 1);

  • (b) other liquid wastes and chemicals, including fuel and lubricants (Group 2);

  • (c) solids to be combusted (Group 3);

  • (d) other solid wastes (Group 4); and

  • (e) radioactive material (Group 5).

Marginal note:Annual review

 Within 30 days after each anniversary of the date of issuance of a permit, the permit holder must review and update his or her waste management plan and provide a copy of the updated plan to the Minister.

Removal of Wastes

Marginal note:Wastes to be removed

 Before the expiry of a permit, the permit holder must remove from the Antarctic the following wastes if they are generated by the permit holder:

  • (a) radioactive materials;

  • (b) used or spent electrical batteries;

  • (c) fuel, both solid and liquid;

  • (d) wastes containing heavy metals or toxic persistent organic compounds;

  • (e) polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane foam, polystyrene foam, rubber, electronic scrap, lubricating oils, treated wood or wood products and other products that contain additives that could produce harmful emissions if incinerated;

  • (f) all other plastic wastes, except low density polyethylene containers (such as bags for storing wastes) if those containers are incinerated in accordance with section 40;

  • (g) fuel drums, except if their removal would result in a greater adverse environmental impact than leaving them in their existing locations;

  • (h) other solid, non-combustible wastes, except if their removal would result in a greater adverse environmental impact than leaving them in their existing locations; and

  • (i) the solid residue of combustible wastes burned in an incinerator referred to in section 40.

Marginal note:Liquid wastes

 Before the expiry of a permit, the permit holder must also remove from the Antarctic all liquid wastes to which section 37 does not apply, including sewage and domestic liquid wastes.

Marginal note:Other wastes

 Before the expiry of a permit, the permit holder must also remove the following wastes from the Antarctic, unless they are incinerated, autoclaved or otherwise treated to be made sterile:

  • (a) residues of carcasses of imported animals;

  • (b) laboratory cultures of micro-organisms and plant pathogens; and

  • (c) introduced avian products.

Incineration

Marginal note:Combustible wastes

 Before the expiry of a permit, the permit holder must burn all combustible wastes, other than those that must be removed from the Antarctic, in incinerators that meet any emission standards and equipment guidelines that may be recommended by the Committee for Environmental Protection established in accordance with Article 11 of the Protocol and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.

  • SOR/2010-196, s. 6(E).

Other Waste Disposal on Land

Marginal note:Prohibited disposal
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), a permit holder must not dispose of any liquid wastes to which section 38 applies onto sea ice, iceshelves or the grounded ice sheet.

  • Marginal note:Disposal in ice pits

    (2) The permit holder may dispose of wastes referred to in subsection (1) in deep ice pits if the wastes are generated by stations located inland on iceshelves or on the grounded ice sheet and that disposal is the only practicable option.

  • Marginal note:Location of pits

    (3) The deep ice pits must not be located on known ice-flow lines that terminate at ice-free areas or in areas of high ablation.

Disposal of Waste into the Sea

Marginal note:Disposal from vessel
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), a permit holder may not dispose of wastes into the sea from a vessel.

  • Marginal note:Exceptions

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to

    • (a) the disposal of wastes in cases permitted under Annex V to MARPOL 73/78, the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as amended by the Protocol of 1978 relating to it and by any more recent amendment that is in force; or

    • (b) the disposal of wastes under a permit issued under Division 3 of Part 7 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Marginal note:Sewage and domestic liquid waste

 Sewage or domestic liquid waste, other than sewage or domestic liquid waste from a vessel, may be disposed of directly into the sea if

  • (a) the sewage or waste is generated at a station with an average weekly occupancy over the austral summer of at least 30 individuals;

  • (b) the sewage or waste is macerated before it is disposed of; and

  • (c) all reasonable steps are taken to discharge the sewage or waste into the sea at a place where conditions exist for dilution and dispersal of the sewage or waste.

Marginal note:Treated sewage

 The by-product of sewage, other than sewage from a vessel, treated by the Rotary Biological Contactor process or a similar process may be disposed of into the sea if the disposal

  • (a) does not adversely affect the local environment; and

  • (b) is in accordance with Annex IV to the Protocol.

Records

Marginal note:List of locations

 Within 30 days after each anniversary of the date of issuance of a permit for a term of more than one year (including the term of any renewal of the permit), and within 30 days after the day on which a permit expires, the permit holder must provide the Minister with a list of all locations where wastes have been incinerated or otherwise disposed of in the Antarctic.

Marginal note:Records

 A permit holder must record each disposal of wastes, including sewage discharges from vessels, and retain the record for five years.

Emergencies

Marginal note:Reporting

 The permit holder must, without delay, advise the Minister about all measures undertaken in response to an emergency.

Marginal note:Emergency plan

 Each emergency plan must

  • (a) identify the potential emergencies, including the potential impact on human health and the environment, that could result from the activities to which the permit is to relate;

  • (b) include an assessment of the relative risk of occurrence of the potential emergencies;

  • (c) set out the names and telephone numbers of personnel and describe their roles and responsibilities during an environmental emergency;

  • (d) identify the training required for emergency response personnel;

  • (e) list the equipment that will be available to deal with potential emergencies and indicate where it is located;

  • (f) identify the procedures by which emergency resources, including personnel, equipment, facilities and financial resources, can be obtained; and

  • (g) describe the procedures for implementing, reviewing and updating the plan.

Coming into Force

Marginal note:Coming into force

 These Regulations come into force on December 1, 2003.

SCHEDULE 1(Section 3)

Application for a Permit Under the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Regulations

(If the space provided on this form is insufficient, please attach additional pages for the necessary information.)

1. General Information

1.1 Expedition

Specify the following:

  • (a) the name of the expedition:

  • (b) the purpose of the expedition:

  • (c) the period for which the permit is requested:

  • (d) the names of the expedition leader and of each member of the expedition staff and their roles and expertise (e.g., scientific research, logistical support):

1.2 The Applicant
  • A Specify the following:

    • (a) the name of the applicant for the permit (last name, first name and initials):

    • (b) the applicant’s role with respect to the expedition or the vessel used in the expedition:

    • (c) the applicant’s address, the number for a telephone of the applicant that is answered 24 hours per day, the applicant’s facsimile number and the applicant’s e-mail address:

    • (d) details of the applicant’s previous experience in the Antarctic or the Arctic, including

      • (i) the locations visited:

      • (ii) the dates of his or her entry into and exit from the Antarctic or Arctic:

      • (iii) the activities involved:

      • (iv) the purpose of the activities (e.g., science, tourism):

      • (v) other relevant details:

  • B Attach two photocopies of the pages of the applicant’s passport that show his or her name, nationality and passport number.

1.3 The Expedition Leader (If the Expedition Leader Is Not the Applicant)
  • A Specify the following:

    • (a) the expedition leader’s name (last name, first name and initials):

    • (b) the expedition leader’s role with respect to the expedition or the vessel used in the expedition:

    • (c) the expedition leader’s address, the number for a telephone of the expedition leader that is answered 24 hours per day, the expedition leader’s facsimile number and the expedition leader’s e-mail address:

    • (d) details of the expedition leader’s previous experience in the Antarctic or the Arctic, including

      • (i) the locations visited:

      • (ii) the dates of his or her entry into and exit from the Antarctic or Arctic:

      • (iii) the activities involved:

      • (iv) the purpose of the activities (e.g., science, tourism):

      • (v) other relevant details:

  • B Attach two photocopies of the pages of the expedition leader’s passport that show his or her name, nationality and passport number.

1.4 All Persons to Be Covered by the Permit Other Than Crew
  • A Specify the following:

    • (a) each person’s name (last name, first name and initials) and address, the number for a telephone of each person that is answered 24 hours per day, each person’s facsimile number and each person’s e-mail address:

    • (b) each person’s role with respect to the expedition or the vessel used in the expedition:

    • (c) details of each person’s previous experience in the Antarctic or the Arctic, including

      • (i) the locations visited:

      • (ii) the dates of his or her entry into and exit from the Antarctic or Arctic:

      • (iii) the activities involved:

      • (iv) the purpose of the activities (e.g., science, tourism):

      • (v) other relevant details:

    • (d) the type and level of training each person has received that is relevant to the nature of the activities to be covered by the permit:

    • (e) the minimum medical requirements set for expedition members before departure (and a statement of confirmation that those requirements have been met):

  • B If possible, attach two photocopies of the pages of each person’s passport that show his or her name, nationality and passport number.

1.5 Vessels to Be Covered by the Permit
  • A Specify the following information about any vessel to be covered by the permit:

    • (a) the name of the vessel:

    • (b) the class of the vessel, including its ice rating:

    • (c) the vessel’s port and country of registry:

    • (d) the vessel’s classification society:

    • (e) the vessel’s registration number:

    • (f) the vessel’s measurements (i.e., gross tonnage, overall length, beam, draft):

    • (g) a description of the vessel (e.g., cargo, passenger, ice breaker) and relevant details (e.g., capacity, fuel type):

    • (h) the vessel’s call sign, telephone number, fax number and e-mail address:

    • (i) the vessel’s HF Radio availability and the vessel’s VHF Radio availability:

    • (j) the name of the person to whom the vessel will report on a daily basis:

    • (k) any special arrangements that have been or will be made to aid navigation and communication while the vessel is in Antarctic waters, including the provision of ice breaking services and the communication of sea-ice information:

    • (l) the vessel’s GMDSS MMSI Number and GMDSS Area Certification:

    • (m) the number of aircraft to be carried by the vessel (see section 1.6 for more information requirements for aircraft):

  • B Attach certified true copies of any applicable valid international maritime certificates, including any exemption certificates, for each vessel covered by the permit.

  • C Specify the following information about the master of each vessel covered by the permit:

    • (a) the master’s name (last name, first name and initials):

    • (b) the master’s role with respect to the expedition or the vessel:

    • (c) the type and level of training the master has received that is relevant to the scope of the activities to be covered by the permit:

    • (d) details of the master’s previous experience in the Antarctic or the Arctic, including

      • (i) the locations visited:

      • (ii) the dates of his or her entry into and exit from the Antarctic or Arctic:

      • (iii) the activities involved:

      • (iv) the purpose of the activities (e.g., science, tourism):

      • (v) other relevant details:

  • D Specify the following information about the crew and passengers of each vessel covered by the permit:

    • (a) the total number of officers:

    • (b) the number of deck and engineer officers and the classes of their certificates of competency:

    • (c) the number of persons in the crew and their working language:

    • (d) the number of passengers:

    • (e) the maximum number of people aboard the vessel while it is in the Antarctic:

    • (f) the type and level of training received by the crew and passengers relevant to the activities to be covered by the permit:

1.6 Aircraft to Be Covered by the Permit

Specify the following information about each aircraft to be covered by the permit:

  • (a) the class of the aircraft:

  • (b) the aircraft’s country of registration:

  • (c) the aircraft’s registration number:

2. Insurance Information

  • A Attach a copy of an insurance policy that sets out the details of the insurance coverage for the expedition, vessel and activities to be covered by the permit.

  • B Specify the following information about the insurance policy:

    • (a) the type of insurance:

    • (b) the amount of coverage:

    • (c) the policy number:

    • (d) the insurer’s name, address, telephone number, facsimile number and e-mail address:

3. Program and Itinerary

Specify the following information about the program and itinerary:

  • (a) the date that is proposed for the departure of the expedition or vessel from Canada and the date for its return to Canada:

  • (b) the location of the final departure for the Antarctic:

  • (c) the dates of entry to and exit from the Antarctic:

  • (d) the means of transport to and in the Antarctic (e.g., vessel, aircraft, zodiac):

  • (e) the planned routes, locations to be visited, landings and activities of the expedition or vessel at all times for the duration of the permit, including the dates, duration and activities related to landings, the maximum number of persons on land at each landing and the ratio of staff to other persons:

  • (f) any planned interaction with other expeditions or vessels:

  • (g) the details of any risk assessments of routes, locations to be visited, landings, activities and contingency plans:

4. Logistics and Support

Specify the following:

  • (a) the types of support required in the Antarctic, including infrastructure (e.g., accommodation, other facilities), food, fuel and equipment, and a statement of the source of the support and the location and date of its provision (specifying quantities where appropriate):

  • (b) whether support services will be provided by airdrop and, if so, a statement of the dates and locations:

  • (c) the provisions that will be made for radio communications (e.g., the equipment to be carried, communication schedules), including contingency arrangements for loss of contact:

  • (d) the provisions that will be made for medical support, including any surgical facilities and the number and type of any doctors and nurses:

5. Mineral Resource Activities

This section must be completed if the applicant is applying for a permit to undertake mineral resource activities in Antarctica.

Specify the following:

  • (a) a description of the proposed activities:

  • (b) the purpose of the proposed activities:

  • (c) the location of the proposed activities:

  • (d) the timing of the proposed activities, including the start date, the end date and the reasons for choosing those dates:

  • (e) the names of the persons, organizations and nations to be involved in the proposed activities and their respective roles:

  • (f) the names of the persons to be covered by the permit:

6. Native Species

This section must be completed if the applicant is applying for a permit to take native mammals, native birds or native plants or to damage habitats in the Antarctic.

Specify the following:

  • (a) a description of the proposed activities:

  • (b) the purpose of the proposed activities:

  • (c) the location of the proposed activities:

  • (d) the timing of the proposed activities, including the start date, the end date and the reasons for choosing those dates:

  • (e) the names of the persons, organizations and nations to be involved in the proposed activities and their respective roles:

  • (f) the names of persons to be covered by the permit:

  • (g) for each species to be affected by the proposed activities, the Latin name of the species, the common name of the species, the number to be affected, the age or life stage, the sex and the health:

  • (h) the procedures to be followed to ensure the most humane treatment practicable of native mammals and native birds:

  • (i) a description of how the species will be transported, if applicable:

  • (j) an assessment of the likelihood that the habitat of native species will be damaged as a result of the activities, and a description of the extent and nature of that damage:

7. Specially Protected Areas

This section must be completed if the applicant is applying for a permit to be in a specially protected area.

  • A Specify the following:

    • (a) a description of the proposed activities and the relevant specially protected areas:

    • (b) the purpose of proposed activity:

    • (c) the location of proposed activity:

    • (d) the timing of the proposed activity, including the start date, the end date and the reasons for choosing those dates:

    • (e) the names of the persons, organizations and nations to be involved in the proposed activities and their respective roles:

    • (f) the names of the persons to be covered by the permit:

  • B Attach a copy of each Management Plan that exists for the relevant specially protected areas.

8. Signatures Required

(Applicant’s signature)(Title)(Date)

(Expedition leader’s signature)(Title)(Date)

(Signature of authorized representative of vessel)(Title)(Date)

9. Contact Information

Applications and related inquiries should be directed to:

Director

Conservation Priorities Branch

Conservation Strategies Directorate

Environmental Conservation Service

Environment Canada

351 St. Joseph Blvd.

Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3

Telephone: (819) 997-5079

SCHEDULE 2(Section 15)

HISTORIC SITES AND MONUMENTS IN THE ANTARCTIC

Column 1Column 2
ItemName of Site or MonumentLocation
1Flag mast at South Pole90°S
2Rock cairn and plaques on Ongul Island, Prins Harald Kyst69°00′S, 39°35′E
3Rock cairn and plaque on Proclamation Island, Enderby Land65°51′S, 53°41′E
4Bust and plaque at ‘Pole of Inaccessibility’83°06′S, 54°58′E
5Rock cairn and plaque at Cape Bruce, Mac. Robertson Land67°25′S, 60°47′E
6Rock cairn and canister at Walkabout Rocks, Vestfold Hills, Princess Elizabeth Land68°22′S, 78°32′E
7Stone and plaque at Mabus Point, Queen Mary Land66°33′S, 93°01′E
8Monument sledge and plaque at Mabus Point, Queen Mary Land66°33′S, 93°01′E
9Cemetery on Buromskiy Island, Queen Mary Land66°32′S, 93°00′E
10Observatory at Bunger Hills, Queen Mary Land66°16′S, 100°45′E
11Tractor and plaque at Vostok Station78°28′S, 106°49′E
12Cross and plaque at Cape Denison, George V Land67°00′S, 142°39′E
13Hut at Cape Denison, George V Land67°00′S, 142°42′E
14Ice cave at Inexpressible Island, Terra Nova Bay, Scott Coast75°54′S, 163°43′E
15Hut at Cape Royds, Ross Island77°33′S, 166°10′E
16Hut at Cape Evans, Ross Island77°38′S, 166°24′E
17Cross at Cape Evans, Ross Island77°38′S, 166°24′E
18Hut at Hut Point, Ross Island77°50′S, 166°37′E
19Cross at Hut Point, Ross Island77°50′S, 166°37′E
20Cross on Observation Hill, Ross Island77°51′S, 166°41′E
21Hut at Cape Crozier, Ross Island77°31′S, 169°22′E
22Hut at Cape Adare, Borchgrevink Coast71°18′S, 170°12′E
23Grave at Cape Adare, Borchgrevink Coast71°17′S, 170°13′E
24Rock cairn at Mount Betty, Queen Maud Range85°11′S, 163°47′W
25Hut and plaque at Framnësodden, Peter I Øy68°50′S, 90°43′W
26Installations at Barry Island, Debenham Islands, Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula68°07′S, 67°06′W
27Cairn with plaque at Megalestris Hill, Petermann Island, Antarctic Peninsula65°10′S, 64°09′W
28Cairn, pillar and plaque at Port Charcot, Booth Island, Antarctic Peninsula65°03′S, 64°02′W
29Lighthouse on Lambda Island, Melchior Islands, Antarctic Peninsula64°18′S, 62°58′W
30Shelter at Paradise Harbour, Danco Coast, Antarctic Peninsula64°49′S, 62°51′W
31Plaque at Whalers Bay, Deception Island, South Shetland Islands62°58′S, 60°34′W
32Monolith on Greenwich Island, South Shetland Islands62°28′S, 59°40′W
33Shelter, cross and plaque on Greenwich Island, South Shetland Islands62°29′S, 59°40′W
34Bust on Greenwich Island, South Shetland Islands62°30′S, 59°41′W
35Cross and statue on Greenwich Island, South Shetland Islands62°29′S, 59°40′W
36Plaque at Potter Cove, King George Island, South Shetland Islands62°14′S, 58°39′W
37Statue at Trinity Peninsula, Antarctic Peninsula63°19′S, 57°54′W
38Hut on Snow Hill Island, Antarctic Peninsula64°22′S, 56°59′W
39Hut at Hope Bay, Trinity Peninsula, Antarctic Peninsula63°24′S, 56°59′W
40Bust, grotto, statue, flag mast, graveyard and stele at Hope Bay, Trinity Peninsula, Antarctic Peninsula63°24′S, 56°59′W
41Hut and grave on Paulet Island, Antarctic Peninsula63°34′S, 55°45′W
42Huts, magnetic observatory and graveyard at Scotia Bay, Laurie Island, South Orkney Islands60°44′S, 44°41′W
43Cross at ‘Piedrabuena Bay’, Filchner Ice Front, Weddell Sea77°58′S, 38°48′W
44Plaque at Nivlisen ice front, Prinsesse Astrid Kyst, Dronning Maud Land70°43′S, 11°40′E
45Plaque at Metchnikoff Point, Brabant Island, Antarctic Peninsula64°02′S, 62°34′W
46Buildings and installations at Port-Martin, Terre Adélie66°49′S, 141°23′E
47Building on Île des Pétrels, Terre Adélie66°41′S, 140°01′E
48Cross on Île des Pétrels, Terre Adélie66°41′S, 140°01′E
49Pillar at Bunger Hill, Queen Mary Land66°16′S, 100°45′E
50Plaque at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands62°12′S, 59°01′W
51Grave and cross at Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands62°10′S, 58°28′W
52Monolith at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands62°13′S, 58°58′W
53Monolith and plaques on Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands61°06′S, 54°50′W
54Bust on Ross Island77°51′S, 166°40′E
55Buildings and artifacts on Stonington Island, Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula68°11′S, 67°00′W
56Remains of hut and environs at Waterboat Point, Danco Coast, Antarctic Peninsula64°49′S, 62°51′W
57Plaque at “Yankee Bay” (Yankee Harbour), MacFarlane Strait, Greenwich Island, South Shetland Islands62°32′S, 59°45′W
58Cairn with plaque at Whalers Bay, Deception Island, South Shetland Islands62°59′S, 60°33′W
59Cairn on Half Moon Beach, Cape Shirreff, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands62°28′S, 60°46′W
60Plaque and cairn at ‘Penguins Bay’, Seymour Island, James Ross Island archipelago64°16′S, 50°39′W
61‘Base A’ at Port Lockroy, Goudier Island, off Wiencke Island, Antarctic Peninsula64°49′S, 63°29′W
62‘Base F (Wordie House)’ on Winter Island, Argentine Islands65°15′S, 64°16′W
63‘Base Y’ on Horseshoe Island, Marguerite Bay, western Graham Land67°48′S, 67°18′W
64‘Base E’ on Stonington Island, Marguerite Bay, western Graham Land68°11′S, 67°00′W
65Message post on Foyn Island, Possession Islands71°56′S, 171°05′E
66Cairn at Scott Nunataks, Alexandra Mountains77°11′S, 154°32′W
67Rock shelter ‘Granite House’ at Cape Geology, Granite Harbour77°00′S, 162°32′E
68Depot at Hells Gate Moraine, Inexpressible Island, Terra Nova Bay74°52′S, 163°50′E
69Message post at Cape Crozier, Ross Island77°27′S, 169°16′E
70Message post at Cape Wadworth, Coulman Island73°19′S, 169°47′E
71Whaling station at Whalers Bay, Deception Island62°59′S, 60°33′W
72Cairn on Tryne Islands, Vestfold Hills68°22′S, 78°24′E
73Memorial Cross, Lewis Bay, Ross Island77°25′30″S, 166°27′30″E
74Wreckage of sailing ship, Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands61°10′S, 55°24′W - 61°17′S, 55°13′W
75‘A Hut’, Pram Point, Ross Island77°51′S, 166°45′E
76Ruins of base ‘Pedro Aguirre Cerda’, Pendulum Cove, Deception Island62°56′S, 60°36′W

SCHEDULE 3(Section 26)

ANTARCTIC SPECIALLY PROTECTED AREAS

Column 1Column 2Column 3
ItemSite No.Footnote for ANTARCTIC SPECIALLY PROTECTED AREAS 1Name of AreaLocation
1101Taylor Rookery, Mac. Robertson Land67°27′S, 60°52′E
2102Rookery Islands, Holme Bay, Mac. Robertson LandWithin a rectangle centred on 67°37′S, 62°32′E
3103Ardery Island and Odbert Island, Budd CoastArdery: 66°22′S, 110°27′E Odbert: 66°22′S, 110°33′E
4104Sabrina Island, Balleny Islands66°57′S, 163°16′E
5105Beaufort Island, Ross Sea76°57′S, 166°56′E
6106Cape Hallett, Victoria Land72°19′S, 170°13′E
7107Emperor Island, Dion Islands, Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula67°52′S, 68°42′W
8108Green Island, Berthelot Islands, Antarctic Peninsula65°19′S, 64°09′W
9109Moe Island, South Orkney Islands60°44′S, 45°41′W
10110Lynch Island, South Orkney Islands60°39′S, 45°36′W
11111Southern Powell Island and adjacent islands, South Orkney Islands60°43′S, 45°00′W. The area includes all of Powell Island south of the latitude of the southern summit of John Peaks, together with the whole of Fredriksen Island, Michelsen Island, Christoffersen Island, Grey Island and adjacent unnamed islands.
12112Coppermine Peninsula, Robert Island, South Shetland Islands62°22′S, 59°43′W. The area comprises all the land west of a line drawn from north to south across the peninsula 100m west of the two shelters found on the isthmus.
13113Litchfield Island, Arthur Harbour, Anvers Island, Palmer Archipelago64°46′S, 64°06′W
14114Northern Coronation Island, South Orkney IslandsThe centroid of the area is 60°33′S, 45°35′W. The area is between 60°31′S, 45°41′W; 60°37′S, 45°36′W and 60°32′S, 45°29′W.
15115Lagotellerie Island, Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula67°53′S, 67°24′W
16116‘New College Valley’, Caughley Beach, Cape Bird, Ross Island77°13′S, 166°29′W
17117Avian Island, off Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula67°46′S, 68°53′W. The area consists of the island together with its littoral zone and the marine area within 100m of the shore.
18118‘Cryptogam Ridge’, Mount Melbourne, Victoria Land74°21′S, 164°41′W
19119Forlidas Pond and Davis Valley ponds, Dufek Massif82°27′S, 51°21′W and 82°28′S, 51°08′W
20120‘Pointe-Géologie Archipelego’, Terre AdélieThe centroid of the area is 66°40′S, 140°02′E. Limits of the area are 66°39′30″S to 66°40′30″S; 140°00′E to 140°02′E.
21121Cape Royds, Ross Island77°33′S, 166°08′E. The area west of a line drawn from the south coast of Cape Royds through Flagstaff Hill to the south-eastern tip of Pony Lake, and the west shoreline of this lake; and south of a line drawn from the western extremity of Pony Lake 280° true to the coast; including the littoral and sublittoral zones from Derrick Point on the east side of Arrival Bay about 4km northwards to ’Rocky Point’ to the north of Horseshoe Bay, extending 500m offshore from the high water mark.
22122Arrival Heights, Hut Point Peninsula, Ross Island77°49′S, 166°39′E. The area of Arrival Heights is enclosed by a line drawn from the Trig T510 north-west over First Crater to the 500 foot (150m) contour, then north along this contour to a point immediately west of Second Crater, then around the lip of this crater and south to Trig T510.
23123Barwick and Balham Valleys, Victoria LandThe site is defined by lines joining 77°13′S, 160°42′E; 77°18′S, 161°24′E; 77°24′S, 161°26′E; 77°24′S, 160°46′E; 77°19′S, 160°29′E and 77°13′S, 160°42′E.
24124Cape Crozier, Ross IslandThe site is defined by lines joining 77°28′S, 169°20′E; 77°28′S, 169°28′E; 77°31′S, 169°28′E and 77°31′S, 169°20′E and also includes the land area lying north of a line from 77°28′S, 169°20′E to the summit of Post Office Hill and north-east of a line bearing 315° true from the summit of Post Office Hill to the coast.
25125Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland IslandsThere are two sites. A: between 62°10′50″S and 62°11′28″S and between 58°55′27″W and 58°56′38″W and B: between 62°12′30″S and 62°13′30″S and between 58°57′11″W and 58°59′32″W.
26126Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, South Shetland IslandsThe area is centred on 62°37′S, 61°03′W.
27127Haswell Island66°31′S, 93°00′E
28128Western shore of Admiralty Bay, King George Island62°11′S, 58°27′W. An area on the western shore of Admiralty Bay, south of Ezcurra Inlet, south of a line connecting Jardine Peak and the shoreline immediately to the north of a prominent group of rocks characterized by a covering of orange lichens bearing approximately 068° from Jardine Peak, and east of a line joining Jardine Peak, The Tower and a point on the shoreline bearing 180° from The Tower.
29129Rothera Point, Adelaide Island67°34′S, 68°06′W
30130‘Tramway Ridge’, Mount Erebus, Ross Island77°31′S, 167°07′E
31131Canada Glacier, Lake Fryxell, Taylor Valley, Victoria Land77°37′S, 163°03′E. The site encompasses most of the glacier forefield area on the east side of the lower Canada Glacier, on the north shore of Lake Fryxell.
32132Potter Peninsula, ‘25 de Mayo’ (King George) Island, South Shetland Islands62°18′S, 58°39′W. The site is on the east side of Maxwell Bay between ’Mirounga Point’ and the east side of Stranger Point, and occupies the coastal zone of varying width up to 500m from the shoreline.
33133Harmony Point, west coast of Nelson Island, South Shetland Islands62°18′S, 59°11′W. The site is on the western side of the island and includes Harmony Point and The Toe, the adjacent ice-free land and the intertidal zone.
34134Cierva Point and offshore islands, Danco Coast, Antarctic Peninsula64°10′S, 61°01′W. The site comprises the Cierva Point peninsula including the land west of a line from the south-east of the north side of the point through the summit of a flat hill of 540m high to the south-east of the south side of the point. Also included are ‘Apéndice Island’ (’Rivera Island’/Sterneck Island), ’José Hernández’ (’Bofill Island’/Midas Island), and ’Lopez Island’ (Moss Islands). Primavera Station (Argentina) and all its associated installations are excluded.
35135North-eastern Bailey Peninsula, Budd Coast, Wilkes Land66°17′S, 110°33′E
36136Clark Peninsula, Budd Coast, Wilkes Land66°15′S, 110°35′E
37137Northwest White Island, McMurdo Sound78°07′S, 167°11′E. The area includes the north-west coastline of White Island from Cape Spencer-Smith in the north to a point protruding into the strait between White and Black islands in the south-west. It extends from the high water mark to 5km offshore across the Ross Ice Shelf.
38138Linnaeus Terrace, Asgard Range, Victoria Land77°35′S, 161°05′E. The site is at the east end of Asgard Range to the north of Oliver Peak, between Don Juan Pond in the valley of South Fork, and Inland Forts, a small mountain range south-east of the Asgard Range. The site includes the flat terrace north and east of Oliver Peak, between about 1500m and 1650m altitude.
39139Biscoe Point, Anvers Island64°48′S, 63°47′W. The site includes the rocky promontory ending in Biscoe Point, the smaller headland immediately to the north and the small islet off the south-west of Biscoe Point. A narrow area of land between the two promontories is included, as is the inshore marine environment within the site boundaries.
40140Parts of Deception Island, South Shetland IslandsThe site includes 5 areas on the coast of Port Foster. Area A: 63°00′S, 60°34′W. From the west side of Entrance Point to the west side of Collins Point on the south side of Neptunes Bellows, and extending 500m inland from the shore. Area B: 62°57′S, 60°42′W. Mid Fumarole Bay, south-west of Wensleydale Beacon extending for 500m along the shore, to the line of precipitous lava cliffs about 100m inland. Area C: 62°56′S, 60°40′W. The island created during the 1967 eruption in Telefon Bay, and including the low land, containing a lake, which joins the new island to the main island. Area D: 62°56′S, 60°35′W. A strip 100m wide extending from the high water mark of the heated shoreline of Pendulum Cove inland to a series of gullies about 750m inland. The area lies about 300m south of the former Pedro Aguirre Cerda Station (Chile). Area E: 62°58′S, 60°34′W. Kroner Lake including the land within 50m of its shore.
41141‘Yukidori Valley’, Langhovde, Lützow-Holmbukta69°14′S, 39°45′E. The site encompasses the area between a tongue of the ice cap and sea at the western end of the valley; it extends up to 50m offshore near the mouth of the stream.
42142Svarthamaren, Mühlig-Hofmannfjella, Dronning Maud Land71°54′S, 5°10′E
43143Marine Plain, Mule Peninsula, Vestfold Hills, Princess Elizabeth Land68°36′S, 78°07′E. The site extends from 68°36′30″S, 78°09′00″E; to 68°36′45″S, 78°10′30″E; to 68°37′30″S, 78°12′30″E; thence south along the meridian 78°12′30″E to its intersection by the low water mark on the northern shore of Crooked Fjord; it follows the low water mark on the northern shore of Crooked Fjord to its intersection with the meridian 78°03′00″E; thence north along the meridian to its intersection with the parallel 68°37′30″S, then northeasterly to 68°70′02″S, 78°05′00″E and finally northeastwards to the point of commencement.
44144‘Chile Bay’ (Discovery Bay), Greenwich Island, South Shetland IslandsArea A: between 62°28′54″S and 62°29′18″S; and between 59°41′12″W and 59°41′43″W Area B: between 62°28′18″S and 62°28′42″S; and between 59°40′15″W and 59°40′47″W
45145Port Foster, Deception Island, South Shetland IslandsArea A: between 62°55′30″S and 62°56′12″S; and between 60°37′00″W and 60°38′00″W Area B: between 62°57′12″S and 62°57′54″S; and between 60°36′20″W and 60°37′20″W
46146South Bay, Doumer Island, Palmer ArchipelagoThe centroid of the area is 64°52′S, 63°35′W. The site consists of a small area of coastal and sub-tidal benthos bounded by 64°51′42″S to the north, between 63°34′00″W and 63°35′20″W, and to the south by a diagonal line that starts at a point 100m north of the Chilean refuge Yelcho on the southern shore of South Bay and extends to 64°51′58″S, 63°34′00″W.
47147Ablation Valley-Ganymede Heights, Alexander IslandThe centroid of the area is 70°50′S, 68°24′W. The site extends from 70°45′S to 70°55′S and from 68°40′W to the George VI Sound coastline.
48148Mount Flora, Hope Bay, Antarctic Peninsula63°25′S, 57°00′W
49149Cape Shirreff, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands62°29′S, 60°48′W
50150Ardley Island, Maxwell Bay, King George Island62°13′S, 58°56′W
51151Lions Rump, King George Island, South Shetland IslandsBounded by: 62°07′48″S, 58°09′17″W; 62°07′49″S, 58°07′14″W; 62°08′19″S, 58°07′19″W; and 62°08′16″S, 58°09′15″W
52152Western Bransfield Strait off Low Island, South Shetland IslandsBetween: 63°20′S and 63°35′S; 61°45′W and 62°30′W
53153Eastern Dallmann Bay off Brabant Island, Palmer ArchipelagoBetween: 64°00′S and 64°20′S; and from 62°50′W east to the intertidal zone
54154Botany Bay, Cape Geology, Victoria Land77°00′S, 162°35′E
55155Cape Evans, Ross Island77°38′S, 166°24′E
56156Lewis Bay, Mount Erebus, Ross Island77°25′S, 167°28′E. The site encompasses the crash zone centered on 167°28′E, 77°25′S and the surrounding glacial ice 2km above and to either side of this position, extends as a 4km wide ‘rectangle’ down to the sea, and includes the airspace above this region to an altitude of 1000m with the exception of a 200m wide air access corridor along the coastline.
57157Backdoor Bay, Cape Royds, Ross Island77°33′10.7″S, 166°10′6.5″E
58158Hut Point, Ross Island77°50′50″S, 166°38′E
59159Cape Adare, Borchgrevink Coast71°18′S, 170°09′E
  • Return to footnote 1The site numbers correspond to the site numbers used for the Antarctic specially protected areas by the Committee for Environmental Protection.

Date modified: