Government of Canada / Gouvernement du Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Search

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Area Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (SOR/2021-247)

Regulations are current to 2022-09-22 and last amended on 2022-01-01. Previous Versions

PART 25Confined Spaces (continued)

Marginal note:Attendants

  •  (1) Every employer must ensure that attendants are stationed outside and near all entrances to each confined space at a workplace under its control while the space is occupied to

    • (a) maintain a record of all persons entering and exiting the confined space and communicate that information among themselves;

    • (b) maintain communication with and monitor the safety of persons in the confined space; and

    • (c) provide emergency assistance to persons in the confined space and summon additional assistance if needed.

  • Marginal note:Means of communication

    (2) The employer must ensure that attendants are provided with a means of communicating continuously with persons in the confined space, of communicating with other attendants at the confined space and of summoning additional assistance.

  • Marginal note:No entry

    (3) Attendants must not enter the confined space.

  • Marginal note:No other duties

    (4) The employer must ensure that attendants are not assigned any duties beyond those referred to in subsection (1) while stationed outside a confined space.

  • Marginal note:Multiple entrances

    (5) If a single attendant is responsible for monitoring more than one entrance to a confined space, the employer must ensure that they are stationed in the location that best allows them to perform their duties in respect of each of those entrances.

Marginal note:Instruction and training

  •  (1) The instruction and training that every employer must provide to employees whose work relates to confined spaces at a workplace under its control, including employees whose work involves entering, evaluating, attending at, supervising persons in or carrying out emergency response procedures in relation to a confined space, includes

    • (a) training on the legislation applicable to confined spaces, including as it pertains to rights and duties;

    • (b) training on the identification of confined spaces;

    • (c) training on and practice in the assessment of risks associated with confined spaces, including the particular risks of carrying out hot work in confined spaces;

    • (d) training on the issuance and use of work permits for the occupation of confined spaces;

    • (e) an overview of the operation of personal gas monitoring devices;

    • (f) training on atmospheric testing, including practice in selecting appropriate testing methods and equipment;

    • (g) training on methods to safely ventilate or remove unwanted substances from confined spaces;

    • (h) training on the measures required under paragraphs 133(1)(d) and (g) for isolating energy and substances;

    • (i) training on methods of emergency response; and

    • (j) training on and practice in the selection and use of appropriate personal protective equipment and rescue equipment in a confined space.

  • Marginal note:Frequency

    (2) The training required under subsection (1) must be provided to every employee before the first time they do any work relating to confined spaces at the workplace and then at least once every three years.

  • Marginal note:Emergency response

    (3) The employer must also provide any employee who may be required to carry out emergency response procedures in relation to a confined space with training and instruction in

    • (a) appropriate emergency response procedures for that confined space; and

    • (b) first aid at a level appropriate to the types of situations that may arise in that confined space.

Marginal note:Completion of work

 Every employer must ensure that, once work in a confined space at a workplace under its control is complete, a competent person verifies that all persons have left the confined space and all tools, equipment and other material not intended to remain in the confined space have been removed.

PART 26Hot Work

Marginal note:Risks

 The risks arising from hot work are prescribed risks for the purpose of paragraph 205.02(2)(a) of the Act.

Marginal note:Work permit

  •  (1) A work permit is required for all hot work carried out at a workplace.

  • Marginal note:Content — circumstances

    (2) The circumstances referred to in paragraph 53(1)(e) that must be set out in the work permit include

    • (a) the location where the hot work is to be carried out, in particular, relative to any areas referred to in subsection 26(2);

    • (b) the presence of any flammable, explosive or combustible material; and

    • (c) the presence of any material that could produce toxic or flammable vapours.

  • Marginal note:Content — procedures

    (3) The work procedures referred to in paragraph 53(1)(f) that must be set out in the work permit must identify, among other things, the tools and equipment to be used in carrying out the hot work.

Marginal note:Requirements

  •  (1) Every employer must ensure that no hot work is carried out at a workplace under its control unless

    • (a) the atmosphere in the work area and any adjacent area that may be affected by the hot work is continuously monitored for flammable, explosive or combustible substances, if there is a risk of them being present in those areas, and all persons in those areas are alerted if there is a risk of any of those substances being present in concentrations exceeding the values referred to in paragraphs (b) and (c);

    • (b) the atmospheric concentration of oxygen is less than 22.5%;

    • (c) the atmospheric concentration of any other flammable, explosive or combustible substance is less than 5% of its lower explosive limit;

    • (d) all potential sources of flammable, explosive or combustible substances have been identified, isolated and locked out;

    • (e) the work area and any adjacent area that may be affected by the hot work are free of all materials that could produce a toxic, flammable, explosive or combustible vapour when heated;

    • (f) a competent person maintains a fire watch patrol; and

    • (g) firefighting equipment appropriate to all fire hazards that may arise is readily accessible.

  • Marginal note:Welding, cutting and allied processes

    (2) The employer must ensure that welding, cutting and allied processes are carried out, to the extent feasible, in accordance with the requirements set out in CSA Group standard W117.2, Safety in welding, cutting, and allied processes.

  • Marginal note:Use of gas

    (3) The employer must ensure that, if gas is used in the carrying out of hot work,

    • (a) all hose lines or pipes that convey gases to the burner, and all couplings, are clearly identified to ensure they are not interchanged;

    • (b) only standard fittings are used and those fittings, as well as any regulator or automatic reducing valve on the equipment being used, are designed for the gas being used;

    • (c) safety devices that prevent the reverse flow of fuel, gas, oxygen or air from the torch end of the equipment being used to the supply lines and that prevent a flame from burning back from the torch end into the supply lines are used;

    • (d) all gas cylinders, piping and fittings are located to prevent them from being damaged or are otherwise protected against damage;

    • (e) all regulators and associated flexible connecting hoses are tested for leaks, using a substance that is not oil-, fat- or grease-based, immediately after being connected to a gas cylinder or other gas supply;

    • (f) while the hot work is being carried out, a person is stationed in a location that allows them to immediately cut off the gas supply in an emergency;

    • (g) the gas supply is immediately cut off if a leak is detected during the test referred to in paragraph (e) or during the hot work and no further work is carried out until the leak has been repaired and another test has been carried out to verify the success of the repair;

    • (h) all parts of the equipment being used are free from defects, leaks, oil and grease;

    • (i) the torch is ignited only with a device that is designed for that purpose; and

    • (j) hot metal parts and electrode stubs are disposed of or otherwise dealt with when not in use in a manner that dissipates heat and minimizes the potential for ignition and fire.

PART 27Hazardous Energy

Marginal note:Definitions

 The following definitions apply in this Part.

electrical hazard

electrical hazard means a danger of electric shock, arc flash burn, thermal burn or blast injury resulting from contact with electrical equipment or failure of that equipment. (risque associé à l’électricité)

hazardous energy

hazardous energy means any energy that can harm a person. (énergie dangereuse)

limited approach boundary

limited approach boundary means

  • (a) in respect of an exposed energized electrical conductor,

    • (i) if it is part of an alternating current system, the distance set out in column 2 of Schedule 1 that corresponds to the conductor’s voltage in column 1, and

    • (ii) if it is part of a direct current system, the distance set out in column 2 of Schedule 2 that corresponds to the conductor’s voltage in column 1; and

  • (b) in respect of an exposed energized circuit part,

    • (i) if it is part of an alternating current system, the distance set out in column 3 of Schedule 1 that corresponds to the part’s voltage in column 1, and

    • (ii) if it is part of a direct current system, the distance set out in column 3 of Schedule 2 that corresponds to the part’s voltage in column 1. (seuil d’approche limite)

restricted approach boundary

restricted approach boundary, in respect of an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part, means

  • (a) if it is part of an alternating current system, the distance set out in column 4 of Schedule 1 that corresponds to the conductor’s or part’s voltage in column 1; and

  • (b) if it is part of a direct current system, the distance set out in column 4 of Schedule 2 that corresponds to the conductor’s or part’s voltage in column 1. (seuil d’approche restrictif)

Marginal note:Occupational health and safety program

 Exposure to hazardous energy, including as a result of the unexpected start-up of any equipment, machine, device or system or as a result of contact with or a failure of electrical equipment, is a prescribed risk for the purpose of paragraph 205.02(2)(a) of the Act and every occupational health and safety program must

  • (a) set out, for each piece of equipment, machine, device and system at the workplace that may present such a risk,

    • (i) the nomenclature by which it is to be identified, which must be consistent with any associated design documents,

    • (ii) detailed procedures for de-energizing it and isolating its energy source using an energy-isolating device at all possible locations, both local and remote, and

    • (iii) detailed procedures for verifying and testing that the de-energization and isolation are complete;

  • (b) set out detailed procedures for securing and removing lockout devices and for affixing tags or signs to those devices;

  • (c) set out the method by which persons in the vicinity of any equipment, machine, device or system are to be notified of its lockout;

  • (d) set out procedures for the orderly transfer of control of lockout devices between outgoing and incoming employees during shift or personnel changes;

  • (e) set out measures for ensuring that, before any equipment, machine, device or system that has been locked out is re-energized, all persons are clear of — and have been instructed to remain clear of — the area in which they would be at risk of exposure to hazardous energy;

  • (f) set out procedures for the inspection and testing of electrical equipment and circuits, including the selection of appropriate testing equipment, having regard to the electrical code to which the workplace is designed;

  • (g) set out procedures for maintaining the integrity of any electrical equipment’s insulation and its enclosure;

  • (h) set out procedures for all work involving hazardous energy, including in relation to

    • (i) the selection of appropriate tools,

    • (ii) the use of personal protective equipment and other protective devices, and

    • (iii) communication with persons in the vicinity of the location where the work is being carried out to ensure the safe coordination of the work with other activities;

  • (i) identify the limited approach boundaries and restricted approach boundaries that apply to all locations at the workplace where shock hazards exist;

  • (j) identify the arc flash boundary for every piece of electrical equipment at the workplace that gives rise to an arc flash hazard;

  • (k) address the number of persons, including electrical safety watchers, needed to safely carry out electrical work and the competencies those persons must meet;

  • (l) set out procedures for carrying out work involving multiple power systems, if applicable;

  • (m) set out procedures for responding to emergencies involving hazardous energy, including with respect to the use of emergency equipment; and

  • (n) address precautions to be taken with respect to battery rooms.

Marginal note:Work permit

 A work permit is required for all work at a workplace that presents a risk of exposing any person to hazardous energy, including any work carried out closer to an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part than the applicable limited approach boundary or restricted approach boundary.

Marginal note:Employer obligations

  •  (1) Every employer must ensure, at each workplace under its control, that

    • (a) hazardous energy is controlled in accordance with CSA Group standard Z460, Control of hazardous energy — Lockout and other methods;

    • (b) every energy-isolating device is

      • (i) designed and located to permit its quick and safe operation at all times, and

      • (ii) marked to identify, in the manner referred to in subparagraph 142(a)(i), the equipment, machine, device or system whose energy source it isolates;

    • (c) lockout devices and locks for securing them are readily available to employees who may need to carry out a lockout;

    • (d) every lock used to secure a lockout device is

      • (i) marked with a unique identification number, and

      • (ii) openable only with a unique key;

    • (e) no lockout device is secured on an energy-isolating device in a manner that prevents access to any other energy-isolating device;

    • (f) every employee who secures a lockout device affixes to it a tag or sign containing only the following information:

      • (i) the equipment, machine, device or system whose energy source has been isolated and the type of energy that has been isolated,

      • (ii) words or a symbol prohibiting any person from starting or operating the equipment, machine, device or system,

      • (iii) the date and time of the lockout,

      • (iv) the name of the employee who secured the lockout device, and

      • (v) the reason for the lockout;

    • (g) no tag or sign is removed from a lockout device by anyone other than the employee who affixed it or to whom control of the device has been transferred in accordance with the procedures referred to in paragraph 142(d);

    • (h) any equipment, machine, device or system that has been locked out is inspected before being returned to service;

    • (i) all electrical equipment is adequately guarded, insulated and, subject to paragraph 91(1)(i), grounded to prevent electrical hazards;

    • (j) all grounded electrical equipment that plugs into an electrical receptacle meets the following requirements:

      • (i) its cord, if any, contains a grounding conductor,

      • (ii) its plug and the receptacle into which the plug is inserted are not

        • (A) connected or altered in a manner that might interrupt the continuity of the grounding conductor, or

        • (B) altered to allow for use in a manner not intended by the manufacturer, and

      • (iii) it is not used with an adapter that would interrupt the continuity of the grounding conductor;

    • (k) work is not carried out on electrical equipment while it is energized unless necessary due to equipment design or operational limitations;

    • (l) a competent person identifies, using an arc flash analysis, all electrical equipment that poses an arc flash hazard and that equipment has affixed to it a warning label setting out the date of the analysis and the following information reflecting the analysis:

      • (i) the equipment’s nominal voltage,

      • (ii) the arc flash boundary for the equipment, and

      • (iii) an indication of

        • (A) the available incident energy and corresponding working distance in respect of the equipment,

        • (B) the arc flash category of personal protective equipment that must be used with the equipment,

        • (C) the minimum arc rating of personal protective equipment that must be used with the equipment, or

        • (D) the site-specific level of personal protective equipment that must be used with the equipment;

    • (m) only the following persons work on energized electrical equipment used for the generation or distribution of electricity or install, repair, alter or test electrical equipment:

      • (i) a person who is certified as an electrician under the laws of a province,

      • (ii) a person who has qualifications from a jurisdiction outside of Canada equivalent to those of a person referred to in subparagraph (i), and

      • (iii) a person who is undergoing on-the-job training under the direct supervision of a person referred to in subparagraph (i) for the purpose of becoming such a person and who has demonstrated an ability to perform tasks safely at their level of training;

    • (n) electrical equipment is installed in a location that minimizes risk to the safety of persons and in a manner that protects the equipment from mechanical and other damage;

    • (o) the working space around and the path of access to every electrical switch, energy-isolating device or meter are free from obstruction and arranged to give authorized persons ready access to them;

    • (p) electrical rooms are not used for storing flammable, explosive or combustible materials or materials that are unrelated to electrical work;

    • (q) volatile flammable substances are not used in any electrical room or other enclosed area through which high-voltage electrical current passes;

    • (r) all electrical equipment that is used in an area referred to in subsection 26(2) has been certified by a competent person who is independent of the operator, employer and manufacturer as being safe for use in such an area;

    • (s) any electrical receptacle or extension cord that is used in an area referred to in subsection 26(2) is equipped with a terminal that interrupts the circuit before a connecting device is withdrawn;

    • (t) all electrical receptacles that may be exposed to weather are weatherproof;

    • (u) all electrical receptacles in an area in which persons may be exposed to water, including within 1.5 m of faucets and showers, are designed or equipped to prevent ground faults;

    • (v) precautions are taken to prevent a plug from being inserted into an electrical receptacle of the incorrect voltage;

    • (w) electrical drawings, produced by a competent person and containing line diagrams indicating the position and voltage rating of all electrical components at the workplace, are made readily available to all persons at the workplace and are updated after any repair or alteration to the electrical system;

    • (x) legible warning signs, written in the official operating language of the workplace with symbols to convey the same meaning, are posted wherever an electrical hazard exists; and

    • (y) a non-conductive rescue hook is kept readily available for use wherever a person is carrying out work that may expose them to a shock hazard.

  • Marginal note:Lockout tag or sign

    (2) If the energy source being isolated is electric, the tag or sign referred to in paragraph (1)(f) must be made of non-conductive material.

  • Marginal note:Isolation of piping

    (3) The employer must ensure that

    • (a) an energy-isolating device used on a pipe that contains a substance that may release hazardous energy, other than in a confined space,

      • (i) consists of a blank or blind in conjunction with valves or other blocking seals that are secured and locked out in the closed position to prevent the substance from reaching the blank or blind,

      • (ii) consists of a double block and bleed system consisting of two valves or other blocking seals that are secured and locked out in the closed position and located on each side of a valve or other mechanism that is secured and locked out in the open position to allow for bleed-off between the two seals, or

      • (iii) has been approved by a professional engineer;

    • (b) the location of any blank or blind referred to in subparagraph (a)(i) is clearly marked on the pipe;

    • (c) all valves or other seals or mechanisms referred to in subparagraph (a)(i) or (ii) are clearly marked to indicate the position they are in; and

    • (d) any energy-isolating device referred to in subparagraph (a)(ii) or (iii) is monitored for leaks.

  • Marginal note:Defective electrical equipment

    (4) The employer must ensure that electrical equipment that is taken out of service under section 88 is de-energized until a competent person determines it to be safe for use.

 
Date modified: